Marquetry, Parquetry and Inlay

Marquetry is the practice of painting with wood, typically with thin veneers, of various colors and grain patterns. Vaneer pieces are cut to shapes and size, and glued to a backer board, or a box, or other comparable job, forming a photo.

When I practice marquetry, I will draw the preferred shape on a notepad to the right size, and eliminated the shape with an Exacto knife, producing a window in the paper. I then put the "window" on the vaneer of option, moving it around in trial positions up until I am pleased with the grain instructions and pattern. I then trace the "window" on the vaneer and make it with the Exacto knife and tape or pin the piece in its particular position on the job. This procedure is restarted up until the photo is total. Last modifications are then made, up until all pieces fit together exactly.

When I am pleased with the fit and the general look, I put the pieces upside down on a piece of adhesive rack liner, and thoroughly cut the rack liner around the completed photo. I then put this system best side up on the vaneer that I am utilizing as my back ground, and trace around the system with my Exacto knife, then cut this window into the vaneer.

When the fit is satisfying, I put the photo system into the window in the vaneer, and tape it in location from the leading side, and prepare the surface area of the support for the application of the glue.

I want to utilize hot conceal glue when veneering, since it provides me a little time making a last modification in the positioning of the vaneer. I spread out the glue uniformly on the surface area and put the composite on the job. I then cover the composite with a layer of waxed paper and location a piece of plywood over the waxed paper, and either clamp the "sandwich" together or location adequate weight on it to guarantee that the glue bond is total. The waxed paper avoids the plywood from staying with the job in case of some squeeze out of the glue, which happens generally. After the glue is set, the vaneer can be cut to fit the job.

Parqetry is a comparable procedure, however typically includes repeat geometric patterns, normally with thicker veneers, and bigger jobs such as counter tops, floors, and so on

. In this case, I typically cut the pattern pieces, do the needed sanding and fitting, and after that, spread out the glue just in a location that can be covered in a couple of minutes, and put the pattern pieces in the damp glue.

It is frequently needed to utilize a notched spreader to use the glue or mastic, which provides the glue a location to compress without raising the formerly put pieces. Parquetry typically includes a last sanding after the glue has actually set.

Inlay is the procedure of putting a piece of contrasting product into a strong surface area, typically wood, however I have actually seen other circumstances of inlay. The procedure is much as I explained when putting a composite photo in a piece of vaneer in marquetry.

The initial step is to form the piece that is to be inlaid. The piece is then placed in its place on the job, and held safely in location while scribing around the beyond the piece with an extremely sharp pencil, a metal scriber, or a sharp knife. I choose to utilize an Exacto knife since the point is extremely great, and the resulting line is extremely accurate. The piece can be kept in location with hot melt glue, double sided tape, clamps, or by hand pressure, depending upon the size of the piece and exactly what is at hand.

As inlay typically includes a last sanding, I want to spray paint the workspace with an acrylic paint that contrasts with the moms and dad surface area prior to scribing, since the line proves and the paint will vanish with the last sanding.

I utilize a rotary tool with a router base and a 1/8" or smaller sized router bit to eliminate the product inside the line. I leave a little stock inside the line, and eliminate the last bit with a sharp knife and a sharp sculpt.

Set the router depth to a little less than the density of the piece to be inlaid. I typically put a few scraps of the inlay product under the router base, and a notepad under the bit on a great flat surface area, and change the depth to simply touch the paper. This enables the inlay to extend above the surface area of the moms and dad by the density of the paper and the density of the glue movie. It is a lot easier to sand the inlay than to sand the whole surface area.

That's it for this publishing. I hope you have actually enjoyed this short article, and as constantly, if I can respond to a concern, or be of support, don't hesitate to email me at campbell5017@bellsouth.net

| When I am pleased with the fit and the general look, I put the pieces upside down on a piece of adhesive rack liner, and thoroughly cut the rack liner around the completed photo. It is frequently needed to utilize a notched spreader to use the glue or mastic, which provides the glue a location to compress without raising the formerly put pieces. The piece is then placed in its place on the job, and held safely in location while scribing around the exterior of the piece with an extremely sharp pencil, a metal scriber, or a sharp knife.

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